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Morning Joe

News/Business. Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski & Willie Geist offering interviews with newsmakers and politicians. New.

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03:01:00

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TV-MA

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel v787

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mpeg2video

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ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

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1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 29, Kathleen Sebelius 16, Donny 14, Washington 13, Georgia 12, Jason Carter 8, Willie 8, Detroit 7, Ford 6, Obama 6, Healthcare 6, Oregon 6, America 6, Chuck Todd 5, Jeremy 5, Mitch Mcconnell 5, Harry Reid 5, Ari Fleischer 4, John Boehner 4, Joe 4,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski & Willie  
   Geist offering interviews with newsmakers and politicians. New.  

    November 8, 2013
    3:00 - 6:01am PST  

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tesla, facebook, twitter, which will be the most prominent. >> raymond says twitter. it turns the world into a room. >> i hope it stays twitter. good job. >> me, too. >> have a good weekend. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >> i am sure that people who love rob ford have tried to make him go to rehab, which he apparently replied, again, this is speculation, no, no, no. and he has seemingly as mayor survived crack smoking admission. well, what's going to test his ability to stay in public office today? [ bleep ] he dies or i die.
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[ bleep ] i will throw his eyes out. >> i don't know what he was saying, but it clearly looks like out takes from "tommy boy." >> all right, is that where we are going to start this morning? >> it's how our staff meetings go. give them a peek. >> that rang, that sort of reminds me of something. i don't know. good morning, everyone. it's friday, november 8th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, please keep your clothes on today. >> what was that? >> what did you do that for? >> larry helps run the red sox, the ceo, we have a celebration, donny takes off his shirt. >> shows his waxed, tanned, chest.
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>> there's no waxing. >> come on. >> let's put this in context. >> oh, i just got sick. >> somebody was complimenting you because you did a lap around or you took a shot at me. to which, i got home -- >> there's not justification for it. there's no justification. >> spike in the numbers like msnbc has never seen before. just saying. >> a plummet. >> donny is here and it's all gross. >> larry said i guess donny deutsche knows how to on a birthday cake. >> i just ate munchkins. >> did you just say that? thank god, julianna goldberg. sorry we left you in the dark with donny. from washington, we have new york times reporter jeremy
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peters. guys, jeremy, stay with me. willie, can you believe this? the fda seeking near total ban on transfats. this is huge. it's going to save lives, thousands of lives. it's really going to change the food we eat, like the frosting i used to eat like yogurt when i was a kid, all transfats. i don't know how they are going make it. doughnuts. popcorn, frozen pizza, coffee creamers. all these things, they are going to have to reengineer them. >> why are liberal sos antiscience? do you know how hard it was to come up with the right mix of chemicals to create transfat that is allow, for instance, i don't know, a candy bar to last after a nuclear explosion? it's not easy to do. this locks in goodness. >> those were good american jobs, too. twinkie. come on. >> pills bury dough boy.
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>> it's a good story. itis good for the nation's health. i'm glad the fda is making this move. >> let's talk about crack smoking mayors. >> rob ford from toronto. >> yeah, it's better than transfats from here. >> okay. fine. >> crack over margarine. >> exactly. >> just as long as we run the nancy snyderman package that is so important on this. can we do that? >> come on, let's go. this talk is killing me. >> this is after he acknowledged he was smoking crack. this is the lead story this morning. it's fine. a revelation that brought light, a lot of different things in terms of his behavior. then there was a new video you just saw of him freaking out. do you know if that was when he was on crack or a different event? >> he said it was while he was drinking, no crack involved. >> he had to apologize for that as well. this is like his fourth apology.
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when he apologized he couldn't do it. he was so embarrassed. >> i'm hoping he was on crack. >> take a look. >> i have made mistakes. all i can do is reassure the people that -- i don't know what to say. >> mayor ford, do you need help? mayor ford, do you need help? is it time to ask for help? >> your colleagues want you to go away. why won't you go away? >> i hope none of you have ever or will ever be in that state. >> why don't you seek help. >> mayor ford, do you need help? is it time to get help? obviously, i was extremely, extremely -- >> turn the page. he needs help. >> i need to see the rant again. let's see the rant again. >> are you kidding me, joe? >> no, i think it's very
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important to figure out the story. >> we are off the rail this is morning. >> we are not. you know what? this is called journalism. i don't apologize for it. watch this. >> he dies or i die. brother, you've never seen [ bleep ] [ bleep ] i will make sure that mother [ bleep ] dies. it will be over in five minutes. if it's ten minutes [ bleep ]. >> all right. see, at least i knew not to run for mayor. i knew there were crack smoking videos of me. i was smart enough. >> you bring perspective to the table none of us have on so many levels. that's sad. he needs help. turn the page on this story. okay? >> actually, he's on the city counc council. >> the crack platform, huh? >> oh, boy.
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twitter has successfully launched the highly anticipated ipo initially priced at $26. remember that? it's a little different. >> willie and i said it was going to be big. >> shares jumped 73% opening at $45.10. it remained around that level for the day before closing just under $45. by the closing bell, it raised over $2 billion moving market value around $25 billion. all of which was extremely good news for the man running the company. chairman jack dorsey is now a billionaire on paper. evan williams worth other $2.5 billion and the crow has a $345 million stake in the company. >> give you perspective on that. they got close to 30 billion, the same value of kraft foods. it is just stunning. this company now turned a profit and has the eyeballs.
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i think we are going to watch it drop in the near term. now it's a question of what to do with that pile of cash. >> unbelievable. we are going to move on now to president obama. this is obviously, i think, probably what should have gone first, but i was happy to do the toronto mayor. this is rough. president obama says he is sorry for promising americans if they like their insurance plan, they would be able to keep their coverage under the affordable care act. he sat down yesterday with nbcs chuck todd. >> i meant what i said and we worked hard to try to make sure we implemented it properly. obviously, we didn't do a good enough job and i regret that. >> do you feel like you owe them an apology? they feel misled. you have seen the anger out there. >> i regret, very much, that what we intended to do, which was to make sure that everybody
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is moving into better plans because they want them, as opposed to because they are forced into it, that, you know, we weren't as clear as we needed to be in terms of the changes that were taking place. even though it's a small percentage of folks who are disadvantaged, it mean as lot to them and is scary to them. i am sorry that they, you know, are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. >> during the interview, the president defended hhs secretary kathleen sebelius. >> i think kathleen sebelius, under difficult circumstances over the last four and a half years has done a great job in setting up the insurance markets so there is a good product out there for people to get. kathleen sebelius doesn't write code. she wasn't the i.t. person. the buck stops with me. i'm the president. this is my team.
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if it's not working, it's my job to get it fixed. >> julianna, what does the white house think of the apology? what were they trying to do here? >> the fact you heard sorry come out of the president's mouth recognizes, means they recognize they have a problem on their hands. between the website, the controversy over people's coverage getting canceled, it's opened the door. it's to legitimize having the credibility. >> they consider it a big deal. we heard people close to them for a long time saying they feel like if they ever admit the mistake, then the door. >> it's a big deal they said sorry. itis what the sorry is about. the sorry is not for what he said. the sorry is they didn't get the policy right. so, they say they have a team looking at an administrative fix to try to get people covered who are now going to be facing higher premiums who aren't going to get subsidies. >> jeremy peters, as you listen
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to the president talk to chuck yesterday, he did apologize, as he said, again, that small percentage of those who would have their policies canceled. >> wait a second, hold on. >> jeremy, you are not supposed to grow a beard. can we go full screen? is he going on the "today" show? >> no shave, no beard. >> the make up lady wasn't here on time. >> the make up lady's fault. oh, wow. another nonapology. >> if you were donny, you would say the make up lady showed up and did the best she could. i'm just so, what's the word? >> rough. >> don't throw the make up lady under the bus. come on, man. >> you look adorable. you carry it well. willie? >> come on. sweetheart, this morning i told you the truth. it's kind of hot. >> did you hear that? >> close up, no good. >> as part of this nbc family, i'm embarrassed about the men
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not being able to deliver -- >> on the beard. >> there's like nothing happening. >> it's not even a week. it's going to be fine. let's get back. jeremy, what did you take away from the president apologizing to chuck todd yesterday? >> i think the question becomes now, what do republicans do with that? one of the things they have struggled with on capitol hill is finding the right strategy. you have seen them come out with no real substantive policies or legislation. it's been, kind of, let's fire kathleen sebelius and issue subpoenas. can they transition it into a meaningful policy act here and really show that they are being a creative force, a constructive force? i'm not seeing that happen, yet, but i'm hearing republicans are realizing they have to do more than just complain. >> yep. >> all right.
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so, i want to go to donny. house speaker, john boehner responded to the president's statement saying if the president is sincerely sorry he misled the american people, he can support this bipartisan effort, otherwise it doesn't amount to anything. he was referring to a vote on the keep your health plan act which allows people to keep the plan that is existed on the individual markets as of january 1st this year through 2014. the president says he has a plan in place to close the gaps. >> i think it's a great idea for republicans. put the plan out. >> big picture -- >> that echoes the president's words over the past several years. if you want to keep your plan, you can keep your plan. if you want to keep your doctor, keep your doctor. i'm sure harry reid is going to try to kill that bill. there are a lot of conservative or moderate democrats in red states that would jump on that,
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i think. >> yeah, this is all tv. the op-ed piece about the poor lady suffering from cancer and basically, they took my doctors away and it's going to cost me more money. the follow up showed her coverage would increase. in six or nine months from now people are getting better coverage, premiums are going down, none of this is going to matter. i think they are going to stay the path. let's let the chips go where they may. say you launched a new car going to be 500 miles per gallon of gas. the first week, the paint wasn't working and this wasn't, at the end of the day, if it delivered, people are happy. >> there's no easy way to do this. there's no easy way to handle a bad rollout. early on when it happened, the president just has to deal with this. he thohas to fix this. >> they are focused on fixing the website.
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they think once the website is fixed, they think everything el else is going to fall into place. they are acknowledging, hey, the product. there's a flaw in the product we are putting out. all along, this is what they have been saying making the metaphor the president used, it's like going grocery shopping with the wobbly cart. november 30th, it's when the deadline to get this fixed. i don't think they would have said november 30th if they weren't 100% confident. >> let's hope. i'm surprised we are where we are today. >> i guess the president -- i throw this to you, too, jeremy. i'm going to throw it on the table. what about his defense of kathleen sebelius? >> it's what a leader does. i think he would have looked weak had he thrown her under the bus. he said the right thing. it's my team, the buck stops with me. >> she was responsible, though. hen he says she's not an i.t.
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expert. that rings hollow. she was in charge to make sure -- i'm not -- i'm throwing this out there. >> it would be destructive. >> did everybody think he handled it the way he needed to handle it? >> i think, joe, one thing i hear from my colleagues who cover the white house is kathleen sebelius is in no danger of losing her job. one of the things we observed about this president is he hunkers down when his team is under fire. you have seen this with eric holder. you have seen it with janet napolitano. when the right comes after his people, which they have done with extreme fierceness over the past few years, he digs in. i don't think he's going to throw her under the bus, at least not yet. >> she is one of the more trusted members of his cabinet, isn't she? >> one of the more trusted members of the cabinet, a key endorsement in kansas back when
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he was running in the primaries and caucuses. i think jeremy is right, kathleen sebelius is safe. the white house is not interested in ceremonial firings. they need to get through the website fix, come back and reassess later. kathleen sebelius was in charge, but was there a ceo of health care? that's part of the question. there is nobody whose been accountable from start to finish for overseeing the implementation of this. >> there was a part of the interview where it was kind of clear he felt he got totally screwed over by his staff, team and the people behind it. he said i got taken by it. i mean the american people got taken by the website. i forget what the word was but it was burned. thank you, tower. i got burned. it was telling. he's not happy. it shouldn't have happened.
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>> and the buck stops with him. >> so, he quickly fixed it. in terms of what he was saying. itis not about him being burned, it's about him being responsible and he knows that. he's not happy. mitch mcconnell is speaking out about the tea party. in a recent interview with peggy noon noon noonan, he said the most important race it was special election for congress in south alabama where the candidate said the shutdown was a great idea, the president was born in kenya and the opposed speaker came in second. he lost 52-48. mcconnell spoke about the tea party more generally saying many have been mislead. they have been told the reason we can't get better outcomes is not because the democrats control the senate and the white house, but because republicans have been insufficiently feisty.
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it's not true. i think the folks i have difficulty with are the leaders of some of the groups that mislead them for profit. they raise money, take their cut and spend it. mcconnell who faces a tea party challenge says he's not worried about his re-election bid. quote, i don't want to be cocky, but i'm going to be the nominee next year. >> for those who want to understand this and the conservatives sorting through what they are hearing from both sides, you have people who make millions and millions and millions of dollars preaching the kind of junk that's been preached over the past six months. if only the republicans were tougher, we would live in a land of lollipops, sunshine and a 12% flat tax. this, of course, ignores the fact that harry reid is the pocket veto for president obama and the president can veto
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anything he wants. this is about math, not ideology. i'm surprised, mcconnell finally, somebody finally had the guts to tell people the truth. this is all about money whether we are talking on talk radio or on tv or whether we are talking about, you know, special interest groups. people are making money selling people snake oil. democrats control the senate and the white house. that's the way it is. >> well, it took him a long time to say it but he finally did. this is why i think mitch mcconnell is so savvy. look where he did the interview. he did it with peggy noonan. he knew exactly the audience he needed to reach to say, look guys, i know exactly what's going on here. i may have been quiet the last few months, but you can count on me. i'm not fooled by ted cruz and mike lee and i'm not going to
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let them push me around. the interview will get a lot of reaction. joe, you touched on something else that is interesting. i have been talking to a lot of outside groups lately. the sense that i got after the government shutdown was that they felt that this fight really wasn't so much about the direction of the country as it was a fight among these groups for who can be the most supreme. that, i think, a lot of conservatives are starting to worry about. >> before we go to -- sorry. >> i was going to say, mcconnell called out specific groups by name. he goes after the senate conservative fund saying nobody elected more democrats over the last three cycles than the senate conservative funds. >> can we listen quickly? >> okay. >> they put up murdock, who lost. they put up sharon engle, who lost. and people running heritage right now. they put up todd aiken who lost. ken buck lost. they put up and they put them
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up, of course they can point to conservative states but you are right, you look at these groups and it is a matter of fact that the only reason harry reid is not retired in nevada right now and why reasons don't control the senate is because of these groups and their stupidity in the primary process. >> i agree with you, the government is too big and problem has disastrous policies. we need to be more strategic to win the elections to unseat the people who put the laws in place. you have to have a strantegy. >> we want to go to bill karinss following one of the most powerful storms ever recorded. bill? >> 12 hours ago, for the first time in human recorded history, a storm of this magnitude moved over a land area.
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think about that. katrina, the rita's and camilles. this was worse. we don't know how bad or catastrophic the damage is, yet. no one can communicate with the region where the eye moved on shore. the eye was huge. you could fit from baltimore to washington, d.c. in the center of the storm it's weakened other the mountains. from here, it will head to vietnam. it will be a big storm for them, not as bad as we saw in the philippin philippines. the other interesting weather e swre vent that is going to take place, the european models predicting a nor'easter snowstorm from north carolina through new england. the american models predicting no snow what so ever. it's a bat that will is going to take place. if you remember, with hurricane sandy, they said it was going to hit new jersey. the american model said out to
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sea. >> willie and i try to do the whole european/american model, we stick with the european one. we didn't see this coming, did we? >> donny prefers european models as a general rule. >> you used to be my wing man. >> too easy, sorry. coming up, chuck todd joins us with more of his exclusive interview. also, rick snyder, howard dean and dr. j. howard dean. >> up next the top stories in the politico playbook. you are watching "morning joe."
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all right. it is time to take a look at the morning papers. "the washington post," for the third time in five weeks, a tesla electric car caught fire after hitting debris on the highway. it has a battery pack located under the car. experts say a puncture to the shield covering the battery could ignite a fire. tesla shares fell 7.5% in addition to the loss on wednesday. >> lululemon's founder speaking out after the recall of the top-selling yoga pants for being see through. they are, of course, the pants willie and i use when we go to the holiday inn.
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when we went over there, we thought the kids just loved us there. they were mocking. >> that is the grossest thought. i want to be -- i just got sick. >> what do you do with your yoga pants? >> i still use them for hot yoga. >> i do, too. you are in there. itis like come on, everybody loves -- that stuff will make you sweat, that hot yoga. >> the thought of you doing yoga -- okay. in an interview, he said, quote, some women's bodies don't work for the pricey yoga pants. >> they are see through. >> he added rubbing on the thighs and pressure over time is a contributing factor. >> it's what willie and i found, also. it gets to be 105 in there. >> a pair of yoga pants retail for nearly 100 bucks. i'm just going to take over. be quiet. remember what i told you yesterday? >> shut up, again?
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>> shut up, right now. jeremy, you write in the new york times, a bill to end workplace discrimination against the lgbt community has overcome the final hurdle. the final vote, 64-32. the bill would extend workplace protections nationwide. however, the bill faces an up hill battle in the house. how so? >> in the house, john boehner doesn't support it. he, obviously controls what goes to the floor. the question is whether or not they can attach it to a larger piece of legislation like the defense bill and hope the conservatives can't object too much. >> it needs to get through. >> what's that? >> never mind. >> it's not going to get through. >> no. >> and this from the home of the undefeated kansas city chiefs, the fda is going to do what many restaurants have already done, cut out transfats across the
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board. it raises the risk of heart disease by increasing bad cholesterol levels. the head of the fda says it could prevent 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths every year. here is nancy snyderman. >> margarine, pizza, chips and more. hydrogenated oil, artificial transfats are used to increase the flavor, texture and shelf life of processed foods. they took the move to announce they want to eliminate them from the american diet. >> everybody recognizes these artificial transfats represent a serious threat to health. they raise the risk of coronary artery disease. by working together, we can reduce artificial transfats further in the american diet. >> reporter: this move is a big step in the right direction. >> there's no nutritional benefit from transfats. they raise the low density
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kounlt, the ldl, the bad cholesterol and lower the hdl, the good cholesterol. >> in 2006 transfat was added to labels to make wiser food choices. new york city banned it in restaurants. other cities have since followed. popular fast food restaurants across the country have eliminated, relaced or reduced the use of artificial transfats in products. the grocery manufacture's association said we look forward to working with the fda to better understand their concerns and how the industry can serve consumers. food industry experts say if it's approved, they expect manufacturers to get creative to keep customers satisfied. >> there's no question scientists are hard at work coming up with alternative formulations that will continue to maximize the allure of their
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products. they are not going to ship stuff, anything to the grocery store that isn't as irresistibly tasty as they can make it. >> of course, thank you dr. nancy snyderman. we are going to talk about this again, never. >> no, major bloomberg, such a leader on this. >> a big event in north carolina. billy graham turned 95 years old. >> ahh. >> he had a big celebration. people saw his last sermon he's going to give. 95 years old. he's a man who sat with presidents from jfk through, you know, bill clinton, been with pope john paul ii. he has, over the past 50 or so years had an extraordinary impact in america and across the world. >> let's go to politico. willie as that. >> the chief white house correspondent at politico, mike allen has a look at the playbook. good morning. >> good morning, willie. happy friday. >> there it is. the weekend begins with that.
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interesting doings in the state of georgia. the grandson of jimmy carter is running in that state. handicapped the race and introduce us to jason carter. >> fascinating georgia race, not only jason carter, grandson of the president running, but the daughter of former senator sam nunn is running for senate. a couple family races going on down there. the jason carter announcement was a surprise. he's a state senator. top issues are going to be education and trusting governor. a way to throw an elbow at the current governor. he is, jason carter is a lawyer, went to university of georgia law school and the democratic party has been out of statewide office in georgia for awhile. this is a hope by democrats they will get back in.
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when he ran for state senate, his grandfather stayed out of it. the former president only campaigned at the end. he said he wanted to earn it on his own, and not trade on the family name. >> the dga is behind carter. he's 30 years old. does he have a shot at winning? >> a primary first, which he probably would win. the current governor is strong. georgia is changing demographically. it's becoming much more democratic. the obama campaign looked early in the re-election race at targeting georgia because of new people moving in. the state is moving that way, but hasn't moved fast enough. >> tough fight. the other item i love most on your website is david ortiz, when the votes were counted, came in third place in the boston mayor's race. true story. david ortiz came in third.
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mike allen, have a great weekend. see ya. coming up, oregon, could they remain unbeaten at stanford? they were down big. they rallied huge in the fourth quarter. we'll show you the highlights when we come back.
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a couple big college
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football games last night. thursday night, unbeaten oregon, number three trying to sneak ahead of fsu to beat alabama. what are you doing? leaned into my shot to see how his jacket was looking. >> unbelievable. the vanity is staggering. >> it's staggering. let's watch oregon at stanford. >> second quarter, stanford up. dives across the goal line. the ducks shut out in the first half for the first time since 2009. shutout into the fourth quarter. oregon blocks a field goal, returns it for a touchdown. it cuts the lead to 26-14. they eventually cut the lead, 26-20 with the help of a kick. it was not enough. stanford holds ongoing up 26-20. now oregon has a loss and is out of the picture unless something crazy happened.
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alabama undefeated, ohio state will sneak up. this other team that is unbeaten, baylor, hosting oklahoma. scary moment in the first. oklahoma receiver, crushed by k.j. morton. he's okay. second quarter, oklahoma with a two-point lead. baylor starts to open it up. bryce petty opens up. five touchdowns from petty, including this one, leading the bears to a 41-12 victory. the knock on them, they had ant played anybody or beat a ranked team. alabama plays lsu this weekend. they have to go to auburn and fcc championship game. >> this weekend is going to be tough for alabama. i'm more worried about this than i have been in a long time. i think they could rise up and beat them. let's talk about oregon for a second. this is a team that has just been inches away from
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championships for the past three or four years, a championship game. they always come up short. a break here, a break there, a field goal kicked here or there. they could have three or four national championships. >> same thing last year. stanford beat them at oregon. they are cruising along, who is going to stop this team, stanford. >> if you get physical -- >> that's what stanford did. fsu looked good going through here. they have to play florida who is down and miami. we'll see. coming up, women warriors. "parade" magazine highlights the challenges by female veterans, all three or four of them. maggie murphy joins us next on "morning joe."
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live look at capitol hill as the sun comes up over washington. here with us now, the editor and chief of "parade" maggie murphy. she's got the latest interview. what did you do in the war, mommy. it's female vets. >> this is a woman, a veteran of iraq, came back. her child was a complete stranger to her. she went to a restaurant and didn't know whether he needed a booster seat or not. the story talks about the challenges women veterans face. different from our male veterans. they are a vulnerable population. they have tlooat least the high rate of homelessness. many of them suffered some kind of sexual trauma. by 2014, we are going to have 80% of the military female vets.
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>> why the highest homeless rate? >> they are single moms. they are less likely to seek help. they want to be that strength person. i think they are just vulnerable. also, the veteran's administration, is proactive in reaching out, but this is an organization used to dealing with men. a woman comes in for help and they say does your husband have an appointment. the veteran's administration is working hard to pivot its organization. we have a slightly vulnerable population. we have woman coming home who had different experiences or taking them in. >> they are changed completely. in that time, they are separated from their children. they come back different people. i think that probably brings alienation to a whole new level. >> their marriages are more vulnerable. i think what we wanted to do was tell two stories of two women
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who came back. stacy went through a lot. her family, her husband was also deployed. she's rebuilt her family. we are going through a different phase with each war, different challenges. >> what i thought was so striking, saying that one of the women that you profile, she waited a year to get help for herself after she had been suffering from migraines, ptsd because her son was having these issues. >> also, the children reflect the drama. i think it's just one of the things that we, as a country, have to think about. you know, we have seen executives and businesses pivot when it's population is different and their needs are different. these women, also, like i said, tend to be single mothers. 40% of the women in military are mothers. you are not just having a mom walk in the door, you are going to have children as well. lots of work. lots of organizations putting their efforts behind it.
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veteran's administration based in texas, a lot of strength and beauty and courage. >> is there a profile of the type of woman going in in the first place. i don't want to say predates issues. is there any profile? it's more of a sacrifice a woman makes than a man, 40% being moms. are there threads of women going in, types of women or profiles that could help us when they come out? >> i think they tend to be doers. colonel dempsey talks about the 9/11 veterans and they tend to volunteer and be proactive. i think women and men alike. i don't know if anybody has done that longitudinal study. i think it would be worth it.
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through anyone who has gone through traumatic stress, they come out and handle it in different ways. i think the way to treat them is where we need to figure out the nuances. >> an important cover story. >> amazing. >> the senate is expected to take up the military assaults in the coming weeks. so, we want to keep our focus on all of this. this sunday, patrick murphy will host a one-hour special in lower manhattan. msnbc will premier wounded, the battle back home to commemorate the wounded warriors. here is a clip from the documentary. >> to endure so much death, carnage, destruction, the things i have seen, the things i have done, the things i have witnessed. i was 17 seeing this. >> i was having nightmares. i asked for help and i was known as a weakling. i went into the division site,
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next thing you know, i'm getting letters from the marine corps saying you are not allowed to handle weapons or wear uniforms. i didn't get a severance check. there was no help. i was ostracized individual. >> taking the hill with patrick murphy will air sunday at noon on msnbc. we'll be looking for the new issue of parad magazine. thing so much. another good one. >> great story. >> you have a good one coming up, too. >> next week. >> very good. "morning joe" will be right back. and just give them the basics, you know. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving. i hope he saved enough. who matters most to you says the most about you.
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♪ vice president, joe biden, doesn't have much luck with gone congratulatory phone calls. he dialed the wrong number. looking for the mayor elect marty walsh, there's like 80 in boston. he dialed two wrong numbers. congratulations, marty, it's joe biden. nice to see you win and labor win. anything i can do to help you from the white house, in terms of your needs in boston, holler, man. congratulations. enjoy the night.
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>> that is so nice. >> what a nice guy. >> he's the greatest. jeremy, your thoughts. or do you want to go shave? >> i can wait to see what the onion does with that. >> go shave now, jeremy. he shaves like five times a day and it grows back. thanks, jeremy. >> by the way, joe will be taking part in a live chat right after the show about his new book, "the right path." we'll discuss what he calls the fall of the gop and how the party can regain its footing. tweet your questions to join in. coming up, we have a packed house. nicolle wallace and howard dean plus david gregory and chuck todd join the conversation from washington. keep it here on "morning joe."
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♪ >> i meant what i said and we worked hard to try to make sure we implemented it properly. obviously, we didn't do a good enough job and i regret that. >> do you feel you owe these folks an apology? they feel misled. you have seen the anger out there. >> i regret very much that what we intended to do, which is make
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sure that everybody is moving into better plans because they want them as opposed to because they are forced to it, that we weren't as clear as we needed to be in terms of the changes that were taking place. even though it's a small percentage of folk who is may be disadvantaged, it means a lot to them and i am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. >> welcome back to "morning joe." look at that live look at the white house. a beautiful day in washington. joining us on the set here in new york, former communications director and former senior adviser for the 2008 mccain presidential campaign, nicolle wallace, former chairman of the democratic party, howard dean. trance fats. >> transfats!
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transfats! we had a great conversation about transfats in the make up room. >> it's great what they are doing. >> the shape of our country. right, howard? >> it's true. it is true. >> former white house press secretary ari fleischer. mr. president, ari fleischer. from washington, we have moderator of "meet the press," david gregory. >> the president, yesterday, offered an apology, sort of a semiapology, what do you think of it? >> i was impressed. i didn't expect it. >> did he need to do it? >> yes. >> good. >> i think people are upset about the glitch. i think, i worry about the glitch. they set an artificial deadline of december 31st. >> you don't think they are going to make it? >> it's going to be tough. >> nicolle, what about you?
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it's always tough for a president to say he's sorry. >> it's tough for a human being to say sorry. it brought me back to 2005 when public support for the iraq war was at a low point. we were desperate for the president to regain credibility among wide numbers of the american people. he gave a speech where he acknowledged mistakes on the military front. it really succeeded in sort of restoring the community. >> i know you love george w. bush and you talked about it, but would he have ever used the words, i'm sorry? >> i don't know. i was very impressed by what president obama did. >> i love it. >> david gregory, jump in. >> president bush deliberatety did not apologize for things because advisers around him, including those there felt that
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the press would jump on him and ram it in his face. especially about the war. he was careful on that line. i thought president obama was careful here as well. there was an apology, but he was careful in how he issued it. it's different than how president obama handles, if you remember back in the beginning of his administration when tom dash el got into this trouble. we screwed up, we made a mistake, it's on me. let's move on. he's caught in trying to fight out of health care as being under this fire. >> i think you are all focused on the wrong part. he said i'm sorry for those finding themselves in this situation. he put them in that situation. he made it sound as if these people did it to themselves and canceled their own insurance. he didn't have to say he's sorry if he wasn't the one -- >> the truth is what's happened and the media underreported it.
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these insurance policies are getting canceled are crappy insurance companies. >> no, they weren't. >> yes, they were. it happened in vermont. >> the president called them subpar and substandard. many liked the insurance. >> people that have insurance -- they didn't have insurance. >> one at a time. howard. >> they were paying 50 bucks a month for insurance that wasn't insurance. it got canceled when you got sick. >> the next policy about to be canceled are union policies. itis why unions are asking for exemptions. they had cadillac plans. the president changed health insurance markets in america. >> for the better. >> let's go to nicolle, then david. >> the problem is, this gets to the essence of people's objection of the federal government taking on a larger role. whether they are plans you
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consider subpar or cadillac plans, people want the power to pick their own plans. >> that was the president's statement for two years. if you like your plan, you can keep it. if you like your doctor, you can keep it. i don't think anybody would suggest this health care bill that had enough trouble getting through would pass had the president not repeated that 26, 27, 28 times. >> what he said after that was no matter what. you can keep it no matter what. he made it seem more simple than the insurance market is. that's the problem. it's overwhelming the benefits to obama care that now exist. the other side of that, to governor dean's point is that as in massachusetts, under romney care, there were minimum standards for health care plans that were offered. the reason it's so is if you want young and healthy people and not picking what kind of coverage they think they need or ultimately the risk model will collapse. it is also true people who get a
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cancellation notice can get another plan that could be a better plan for them. this all is very complicated and does not detract from the point when he said you can keep your plan no matter what, that wasn't right. >> the bottom line is the rollout was faulty. that's painful. now the question is, whether this next promise can be kept. >> this is the interesting thing. the rollout was faulty. the reason is the tech problems. i have been through a lot of rollouts, not all health care. we are innovative and wonderful in creating health care. it happens again and again and again. the problem is, it happened in the biggest tech rollout in the history of the world. >> do you think it was smart to give another deadline? >> if they are going to make it, it's great. >> it's great. >> you know, my rule on this stuff is, in general, the tech rollouts, it takes twice as long as they told you, costs twice as
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much and you have to do it twice. >> take off the republican hat, take off the george w. bush hat. >> happens here at msnbc. >> let's pretend you were going to be a political guy. ari, you are a crisis management guy, what do we do? >> right it out and hope it turns right. there's little you can do from a communications point of view. it's going to come down to whether or not the program is successful or not. it's going to take years to filter out. when people say it feels as if their premiums are going up, they blame it all on obama care. he owns health care. >> they will. >> he has broken health care. he owns health care. >> i'm sorry. i was going to say, it's a great point, howard, the president put himself in this position. he's going to get blamed for a lot of thing that is are his fault. he's going to get blamed for a lot of things that aren't his
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fault. he got burned. >> people are not going to look at the insurance poll say seasoned ajohn boehner, why didn't he offer that. >> somebody who can get insurance now is going to be glad they got it. >> if they meet the december 1st deadline, here is what's going to happen. this health care is cheaper. the reason it's cheaper is not always good. you get a better policy. it's cheaper in general for the vast majority of people. why? there's a tax subsidy. the hidden problem, people are going to be happy with health care as soon as it starts working, they are. it's a better deal for most americans. the problem is -- >> only if young people sign up on a website that's been broken now for a month. >> it's a very complicated question. i'm going to take issue with it. >> i don't disagree with complicated. it's what people understand about it. >> i think they are wrong. i never thought you needed an
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individual mandate. if you don't need an individual mandate, it doesn't make a difference if young people sign up or not. we want them to sign up because they need insurance. >> but, governor, look, the white house officials who work most closely with it say what's key to making it successful is to get the pool right. >> david, i know they say that. i thought they were wrong from the beginning. it's the same consultants to put together romney care. i don't believe it. i have 20 years experience making it work. we can go into it another time. the bottom line is the next crisis here, assuming we get through all this is the tax subsidies. it is going to make the federal budget more expensive. >> here with us now from washington, chief white house correspondent chuck todd. >> chuck, surprised that the
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president uttered the words, i'm sorry? you asked a good question and got that response. are you surprised you got it? >> reporter: i got the impression they felt they had to deal with this issue. they can read polls. there's accusations they are in a bubble too much. they know that this constant -- this issue, this bigger issue of if you like your health care plan, you can keep it, period. the fact it has become -- turned into a punch line on late night, become such an issue with even, you know, wasn't just a partisan republican throwing stuff at them. i think they felt the need they had to deal with it. you know, it is, to me, at this point, i think about the white house trying to buy a little time. trying to buy breathing space. think about it. it's been 40 days since the rollout. they got 20 days now to get this website totally functional. >> i hope they can do it. david gregory. >> chuck, it's david. ari and nicolle are sitting
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there. think about what happened to president bush, the nexus of the rock and katrina and the huge competency question. obama care is not about a fundmental need that government is supposed to address. it's novel and ambitious. it's still important in whether the government can a, solve a problem this large using the full weight of the government and whether they can manage it. the president is under a lot of pressure on that question. >> what the democratic party fights for. what they are about. the belief that government can help you live a better life. that government is a part of this. not that government, you know, they can debate how much government and that gets debated inside the democratic party. ultimately, the idea that government is part of the solution of problems that are in society. one of those problems being health care.
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if this doesn't work, how does he get the trust of the american public to do immigration reform or to implement immigration reform? they know this. the president knows this. this is why they feel the pressure in the moment but also why the implementation, if it doesn't work. the repercussions will be far beyond health care. >> ari, from a communications perspective, put yourself in jay carney's position. what advice would you give the president? >> i would advise jay to get in the private sector. >> so snarky. >> they will be together some day. i'm going to buy a ticket. they will. >> i'm always nice to jay. >> actually give advice if you were advising the president right now and if you saw what
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happened last night, would you have advised him to do that? >> he needs to change the topic. he has to ride it out, do his best on obama care. itis not going to be communications or spun driven. he needs to change the subject, get into other areas. let me go to the substance of this. i was in pittsburgh at an event. i asked, i had five students i was talking to, going to graduate soon, whether they are going to sign up for obama care. four said no, one said yes because she had health issues. the others said no, we don't make enough money. we'll pay the penalty. that is going to happen where young people, david gregory, are going to say, wait a second, i can pay 95 bucks or i can get health insurance? i'll pay the 95 bucks. the same thing goes, i have been saying this for several years. fortune ten ceos, the men and women that run the largest
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corporations in america said i'll keep them on my rolls three or four years, then we're going to let them all go. they can go into the government, you know, market. >> look, what governor dean says, he's got the experience to back it up. others are not just working on the policy. the white house asked the question, how can you convince, persuade young people who feel they do not need something, health insurance, to buy what they don't need. >> on a website that doesn't work. >> right. you asked ari about what he would do from a communications point of view. they took it on matters that had to do with life and death. they know it well. one of the questions i have about what's going on inside the white house now is, they are in the position they are in from a communications point of view with the congress and with the public you really do want to take people to school. the vacuum will be filled by people who are nay sayers. if you are not saying here is where we are, here is where we
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are trying to get to, here are good things and here are challenges. i think that's one of the questions about how they want to, you know, address this on a daily basis as we move forward. >> chuck and david, you guys obviously have been around the white house a lot. you have seen this happen before. you have institutional memory. good lord. president's that get reelected should go to france for the fifth year and then come back. you think about the fifth year. think about for george w. bush, think about katrina, think about harriet myers. >> ari was gone by then. >> nicolle was there. >> social security. >> and social security. you can't explain to a white house coming in, i said this to a good friend in the white house
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early on, no, you are not the first people walking through the doors thinking you were smarter than anybody else that walks through the doors before. isn't it amazing, every white house, eventually is just, any confidence is broken in two. these second terms, we talked about second terms are horrible. you have to go through the stretch. how is this white house handling it? >> well, look, they had the added degree of difficult -- well, frankly, it's very similar watching the health care implementation where something where you have an entire political party doing everything they can, in many ways to stop it or point out every flaw. it is similar to' 05 and social security and where you had the entire democratic party doing everything they could to make sure president bush couldn't get off the ground with that. there are similarities. there's something about a second
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term where you feel you want to do the big things and the bigger you try, the more the other side, so frustrated by losing twice, even triples down. >> yeah. >> in trying to stop you. that's what you underestimate is the opposition. >> you also think about it, joe and mika, like a management team. they come in in four year, they have a vision for what they want to do, then they get to this place where they are into a second term. there's things out of their control that happened, things coming home to roost from certain policies. itis largely the same team thinking about it, getting tired and running into opposition they didn't think about. it's why white house's -- it hasn't happened in the bush presidency. they want to make a turn, they bring in new people to think about the strategy differently. bush and cheney's relationship moved more apart at a critical time in foreign policy. here to, differents that are
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needed in strategic thinking. >> david just touched on what i was going to so. it's not a coincidence the negotiations in iran are going on now. what the presidents do year after year after year, they turn to foreign policy. the domestic policy, whatever it is gets so tough for all the reasons david just said, they turn to foreign policy. they pretty much have complete control. >> it's always hard in the white house, whether your first or second term. the issues are massive. i think it's harder today than it was when nicolle and i were there. it's always hard. that's not to excuse president obama, but i understand a lot. >> that's not, i think moving into politics. i think the whole climate is so fast. it happens to athletes and people in your business. this is everything. this is -- >> you think it's harder today even than when you were there?
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when you were there it was igly. >> the climate is faster. the pace is faster. >> before we go to break, ari fleischer, you write why the white house must pass. >> you have to transcend partisanship. when it comes to equal rights for gays, why lose a job because of sexual orientation. i call on the house of representatives to call on it, vote on it and pass it. >> ari fleischer, howard dean. chuck thank you for being here. david -- >> congratulations chuck. >> david, what do you have on "meet the press" sunday? >> chris christie coming up. also a lot of attention on the potential deal with iran. we'll be following that. >> all right.
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nicolle stay with us. >> one of facebook's first employees. now, randi zuckerberg is focusing on helping people untangle their wired lives. her ceo brother, mark zuckerberg, what does he think about that? we'll be right back. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart.
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♪ donny, want me to read you a book? >> yes, mommy, please. >> donny is going to like this too much. >> donny, it's okay. you can sit on the floor indian style, okay? sit indian style. okay? donny -- >> does anyone else think it's creepy that donny likes it so much. >> she knows how to tap, to touch, to tweet and to tag.
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she knows how to surf. >> can you do it again. >> to swipe, to share and to search. and dot loves to talk and talk and talk. dot, is all talked out. look at dot on the floor. mom says go outside, dot. time to reboot, recharge, restart outside. >> yeah! >> dot remembers to tap. she's tapping outside. to touch. she's touching flowers. to tweet. she's tweeting like the birds and to tag. she's playing tag. >> oh, my. >> you want to remind your children to go outside, donny. go outside, donny. go now, donny. go! get out. this book is amazing. written by the founder and ceo of zuckerberg media. randi zuckerberg, the author of two new books, dot complicated,
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untangling our wired lives and our children's book, dot. donny needs that. i loved meeting you last night. >> thanks, it was a beautiful art show. >> she sold everything. immateri i wanted to buy the little one. dot untangle my life. >> i have a complicated relationship with technology, growing up on the front lines of social media, working with a sibling, you talk to any mom you meet, they have a complicated relationship. president obama right now, as a complicated relationship with technology. it's time to engage in a discussion. >> it's funny, given who you are and who you are related to, think you would write an opposite book. why does it work? >> in the early days of social media, there's a mad rush to get
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as many friends as you can. we are oversaturated. >> get instant love instead of generating a real connection. >> you are right. it starts with a quote i love. it says you only live once. make sure you spends 15 hours a day on the internet seeking the attention of strangers. >> so good. >> i'm a dad. i have these little girls. their instinct is like this. it drives me crazy. it cuts off my time with them. i'm so -- >> what's going on there. >> i am so ckoconcerned about t creative development of the minds and the interpersonal skills. how do you counter balance that? >> you have to look at the glass a bit half full in that resprekt. these days, young kids are learning how to take beautiful images in ways we never learned. they can tell a captivating story in 140 characters.
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you are right. they are missing the eye contact, the handshake. i walked into the starbucks and i was the first person who made eye contact with them all day. everybody is buried in their phone. the first step is take stock in your own behavior. it's easy to look at your children and say give me your n undivided attention. if you are the one answering a e-mail. >> if son is 2. if my husband and i are on these, he will take them and put them in a dump truck. there's a sense this takes you, as a parent, away from your child. >> as early as six months old, my son understood he was sharing my attention with technology. as i was embarking on writing dot complicated, it struck me, if people wait to read this message until they are old enough to read a nonfiction
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book, it's too late. >> it's amazing with how intuitive they are with the devices. if i need to know how to use a remote, that is like a device now. it's a minicomputer, i have to ask my youngest. >> they are the best i.t. support you have around. >> anything. it seems to come out of nowhere. >> all of us as parents, no matter how tech savvy we are, it's a second language to us. it's a first language for a child born today. they are just digital natives in a way, we are going to be laughed by our children. >> i have noticed a lot of teenagers that can't spell. >> that's right. cursive is gone in schools. >> really? >> it's gone! it's so sad. >> social anxiety. when you were a 14-year-old, in school, you spoke in front of the phone. they are never off. there's six kids on chat. it is a party they are not at,
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they know they are not at it. everything is documented. >> have you heard of fomo, fear of missing out. it's basically now you can see all these events and things everyone in your network is going to. people are starting to feel like their lives are better than them. it's invoking feelings of missing out. >> fomo! you are such a fomo. >> really bad case of it. >> one minute you want to play mommy. the next minute -- >> donny, let's get it clear. you were the only one playing mommy. >> mika was reading a book, you were playing mommy. >> it was a good reading. >> i'm biting my tongue. >> i love this book. i need kindergarteners to read it to now. it's so simple. >> randi and i share a dear friend publicist, steph jones.
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she's amazing. much smarter than her brother. >> thank you. >> we did all the illustrations. we clap rated digitally over skype and google. >> it's so sweet. dot complicated is so important. dot complicated, untangling our wired lives and the children's book is dot. randi zuckerberg, thank you so much. >> thanks for having me. up next, one of the greatest basketball players off owl times. juli julius erving joins us. . [ man ] adventure, it means taking chances. it means trying something new. [ woman ] that uncertainty of what's to come. ♪
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♪ here with us now, legendary basketball player, julius everybo everying, the author of "dr. j.." >> i don't want to hear about michael or any of that stuff. guys -- dr. jay was that way. the first time i saw him fly, i was like oh my god, this is
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something like completely out of nowhere. i have never seen it before. >> i saw six or something celtics games as a kid. i'm a little awe struck. this is the real deal. >> everybody who ever met him says magic johnson, quote, when greatness meets class, that's when got created greatness. >> you don't need a lot of blurbs. we'll introduce him now. dr. j. you have your book, "dr. jay, the autobiography." i think your father just died, everybody was looking at you, waiting for you to cry. you said that's not me. i'm reserved and don't give people what they want. why did you decide to open up and tell your story? >> i'm 63. before, at 21, 31, 41, someone
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tried to do an autobiography on me when i was 24. how ridiculous is that? i see a lot of books coming out by athletes in the middle of their career chl. it's autobigraphical. i don't think you can tell it. i say i want my life to be an open book. >> yeah. >> now, i'm okay with it. >> so, so, let's talk about growing up. >> okay. >> pretty tough. pretty tough for you. >> relatively speaking. it wasn't hell's kitchen. i was in the projects. mom and dad separated when i was young so street children. my mom loved us. she mostly did domestic work at doctors offices. she got us through. she got us through. one of the things is a continuous theme throughout the book is i never wanted to do
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anything that would make her life more difficult. when it came to a lot of things that were a part of my young adult life, the challenges and kids smoking pot, the relations and stuff like that, i was always conscious of, what would my mom say. i don't want her reading about me getting arrested and shackled and carried off to jail. so, i was pretty good kid despite tough circumstances. >> when did you know that you wanted to play basketball, that you could do things with a basketball nobody else could? >> i didn't know i wanted to play from age 11 or 12. i got on the traveling team and that was the big thing. if you can get on the traveling team, go to new jersey, pennsylvania, connecticut, play against other competition. see where you stood. i wanted to for a long time. i didn't know until i was 20. literally, there are guy who is are pros.
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tony parker was a pro at age 15. i went to an olympic camp for the '72 olympic games. i was the leading scorer among the best young players in the nation. it wasn't a fluke. i heard them talking about their procareers. it made me start thinking about it. well, they are talking about becoming pros and i'm better than they are, maybe i have a shot. >> a lot of great players, jordan went to north carolina. the dukes in kansas of the world. you went to university of massachusetts. is that because you didn't have a lot of choices, you were a late bloomer? talk about what it was like to go to a school not known for basketball and emerge like you did. >> it was like the big fish in the little ponld. i could go somewhere, be a little fish in a big pond or a -- >> you could have gone to those places? >> i heard from schools. i only visited iowa state in
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terms of big eight. never heard from pac-10. never heard from the acc. they actually recruited two kids all long island players and one was a guy named bill chamber lan who went to north carolina and tom reicher who went to south carolina. they were in my class coming out of high school. we were part of two of the long island players. i went to u mass and the other guy, the fourth guy went to penn. >> donny. >> it's where i went. i grew up watching you play. big fan. i was in philly when you were playing with the sixers. i have never seen other athletes talk with such reverence about other athletes. obviously, today, last few days horrible story, miami dolphins, the bullying, as a guy who clearly commanded a locker room, did you ever see anything like this and how did it play out?
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if you are in the locker room, what do you do? >> i have seen guys square off in the locker room. i think it's the captain's responsibility to intervene. basketball is different than football or baseball. 25 players in a baseball locker room. 50 some odd players in a football locker room. you need more marshalling than one person. captains, co-captains, trainers, whatever. in basketball, it's only 12. it's critical, if two guys are having it it, whether it's verbally or physically, it can destroy the whole season for the team in basketball. it needs to be addressed very quickly. chuck daily was always good at it. if you address them as mole hills, they never turn into mountains. >> we have to ask you this question, who is the best player you played against. >> careen abdul-jabbar. >> really? >> i love michael, magic, larry.
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respect. 22 years at his position -- >> yeah. >> -- dominating his position, making everybody around him better. i felt as though i was in kareem's shadow. >> you were the best in the world. how nice to here that about kareem. he's always overlooked. in the history of the league, night in and year out, the numbers speak for themselves. >> you know what i didn't realize until i read this book? you played for pistol pete. you played with him in '72. >> yeah, we were in training camp together in atlanta and hit it off very well. on the way over here, i was thinking about three people being in the silver dome one
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night. it was me, pete and dick. no fans, just a camera. it was one of the greatest basketball experiences in my life. >> what that guy can do with a basketball. >> when he posted it. >> the book is "dr. j." thank you so much. up next, michigan governor, rick n snyder joins us. ken cuccinelli's loss in virginia and the state of the republican party. we'll be right back.
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♪ as far as the plagiarism goes, i'm sure there's a reasonable explanation. >> i think the spoken word shouldn't be held to the same sort of standard you have if you are given a scientific paper.
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98% of my speeches are, it is hard to footnote things accur e accurately. >> only 2% of his speeches are plagiarized. most of those are taylor swift lyrics. really -- >> here with us now, republican governor of michigan, governor rick snyder. this show just doesn't stop. >> dr. j. you know, i want to talk about the republican party, but first talk about detroit. we went there and a lot of great challenges in detroit. what's happening with ford and uaw working together to save that company and what's happening in downtown detroit is actually exciting. >> it's very exciting. it's a message i hope people recognize when they hear of bankruptcy. there are two take aways i ask people to think about. the bankruptcy is a solution. it's not a new problem. we are solve 60 years of
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problems in detroit. detroit's comeback has been going on for several years. there's been $12 billion of private investment. billions of dollars in the city. >> $12 billion. people investing in detroit because they believe. >> 12,000 jobs moved in the city. >> wow. >> in terms of young people, there's 98% occupancy in midtown and downtown detroit. young people can't find housing. they are young professionals moving into the city. that happened in spite of the government having these issues. if you think about the value opportunity that is going to exist, because we are going to turn the situation around and have the city providing good services. >> it really is. we are excited. we are going to head back there and we apologize for cheering for the red sox for a week or so. i will tell you -- >> congratulations to them. it can is tigers were amazing. pitching amazing. i would not want to be scherzer in the off season.
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>> we got the wings coming and the lions going. we are doing well. >> it's exciting. let's talk about the past week. what is your take away from the elections from the republican party. >> there's challenges in our party. there's nothing new. there's a broken political culture at the national level. look at see when they are doing press conferences two miles apart instead of getting in a room and solving the problems. the place to look are the governors and the city. >> is the governor's the place to look, too, in terms of what might emerge in the republican party or what might be wrong with the republican party? >> yeah, if you look at the national, there are three key issues that stand out. one, just doing a budget, let alone balancing a budget, tax and tax reform. in michigan, we have done all three of those. they are working well. other states have done these things. >> i'm talking chris christie
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versus ken cuccinelli. >> they are two separate states. chris christie has done a great job in new jersey. he's a good guy. i'm not going to draw conclusions on that. look at the governors conclusions, but chris has done a good job. >> i need to say quickly, on ken cuccinelli, this is something everybody thought would be clean cut and our ideas are right and he will lose by ten points and this is the end of this. >> you said all week it was going to be a lot closer. >> closer than everybody said. cuccinelli could have won. >> he is saying look, you guys need to get behind me. i lot of by three points. do we learn from the tea party or embrace it? if you look at the cuccinelli argument, there was a winning ticket there. >> i take a different approach. i don't see it as running to or
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from anyone, i view it as solving problems. they are not looking for politicians fighting. i call it relentless positive action. i don't worry about the politics. here is the problem and the facts and common sense. let's be relentless. it works. michigan is the come back state. we have taken that approach. citizens don't want to hear about it. they want a better out come. a balanced budget and pay down debt. >> can you explain the pragmatism gap. governors have to balance the budget. they are shutting down the government. it's against most state's constitutions. what happens to republicans when they come to washington and think it's a good use of time to shut down the government that is supposed to be solving problems and helping people. >> i wouldn't generalize. there is a lot of good republicans who want to get things solved. >> but they lot of this last debate. i don't want to generalize, but
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the republicans lot of this last part. >> i don't view it as one party is responsible for all of this, but people believing that fighting is more important than solving problems. that's something that we as citizens say we lower the bar too far. we need to lower that back up and expect accountability. i was never in public office. that had value to say i don't have that baggage because i was just there to solve problems. we need more people in the private seccor to get in the public sector. >> you are exactly right. bob costa interviewed people on cuccinelli's campaign. we are talking about they didn't get the money. you know who they are blaming, a greater reporter for the national review? they are blaming the shut down republicans in washington. they said if -- >> they talked about obama care. >> the plan was to start talking about obama care two weeks
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earlier than they did. when they had the shut down strategy, it blue up the cuccinelli campaign's plan for the closing month. they are exactly right. if they had not taken on the strategy that we said was going to fail, ken cuccinelli would be governor right now. >> i don't disagree. >> we are coming back to detroit. >> this is looking better now. >> the monthly jobs report is due out with live coverage and offers of a new book featuring unique ag turnatives for putting them back to work. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence.
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. >> here it comes. mc connell versus the tea party. why he said tea party members have been blatantly misled in the name of fund-raising and money. >> next week. joe's book. >> hold on. comcast commerce. that will be in the plaza. >> no joke. big book next year. >> he's doing a live chat. monday columbia and tuesday barnes and noble and politico politics and thursday chicago and monday miami.
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. >> i'm sure that people who love rob ford have tried to make him go to rehab to which he has replied no, no, no. and he revived his crack smoking
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admission. what is going to test him today? >> you guys are -- [inaudible]. >> i don't know what he was saying, but out takes from tommy boy. >> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast and 5:00 on the west coast. it's friday. >> happy friday. yes. >> and you bring me donny. >> donny deutsch. >> really? julianna goldman is here thank goodness and from washington, jeremy peter who is is such a man. he shaves and shaves and shaves and still looks like that. all right. a revelation that brought light, a lot of different things in
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terms of behavior and then a new video that you saw of him freaking out. do you know if he was on crack or a different event. >> he said while he was drinking. no crack involved. >> he had to apologize for that as well. this was like the fourth one. when he apologized he couldn't even do it. >> i'm hoping he was on crack. >> no, take a listen. >> i have made big mistakes and all i can do is reassure the people that -- i don't know what to say. >> do you need help? mayor ford, do you need help? is it time to ask you for help. >> your colleagues want you to go away. why won't you go away. >> i hope none of you have ever or will ever be in that state. >> why won't you get help?
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>> is it time to get help? >> obviously it was extremely, extremely -- >> turn the page. he needs help. >> i need to see the rant again. >> you guys are -- [inaudible]. [ bleep ] [ bleep ]. >> i knew not to run for mayor if there was a crack smoking video. i was smart enough for that. >> you bring perspective that none of us have actually on so many levels. >> the guy is gone. >> that's sad. he needs help. turn the page on this story. >> you know where he is? >> he's going to city council.
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>> he was set up. in his defense. >> twitter has successfully launched the highly anticipated ipo initially priced at $26. it's different now. >> we said this was going to be big. >> shares jumped 73% opening at $75.10. it remained around that level before closing under $45. by the closing bell, twitter raised over $2 billion with a market value of around $25 billion. all of which was extremely good news for the man running the company. jack dorsey is now a billionaire on airplane. evan williams worg over 2.5 billion and ceo dick costolo has a million stake in the company. >> that's the same as kraft foods. it is stunning this company
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turned a profit, but has the eyeballs. i think we are going to watch it drop in the near term. now it's the question. >> okay. all right. we are going to move on to president obama. this is obviously i think probably what should have gone first, but i was happy to do the toronto mayor because this is uf tough. he said he is sorry for telling americans if they like their plan they can keep their plan. he sat down with chuck todd. >> i meant what i said. we worked hard to try to make sure we implemented it properly. obviously we didn't do a good enough job and i regret that. >> you feel like you owe the folks an apology even if you didn't intentionally do it. they feel misled and you have seen the anger out there. >> i regret very much that what we intended to do was make sure
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that everybody is moving into better plans because they want them as opposed to being forced into them. we weren't as clear as we needed to be in terms of the changes taking place. even though it's a small percentage of folks who may be disadvantaged, that means a lot to them and it's scary to them and i am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. >> okay and during the interview the president also defended hhs secretary kathleen sebelius. >> i think kathleen sebelius under difficult circumstances over the last years has done a great job inny issing up the insurance market so there is a good product out there for people to get. kathleen sebelius doesn't like code. she wasn't the it person. the buck stops with me. i'm the president.
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this is my team. if it's not working, it's my job to get it fixed. >> what does the white house think of the apology. what were they trying to do? >> first of all, the fact that you hear sorry come out of the president's mouth recognizes and means they recognize they have a problem on their hands and between the website and the controversy over people's coverage getting canceled, it's opened the door to the credibility. >> they consider it a big deal. we heard people close to him for a long time saying if they admitted the mistake -- >> they consider it a big deal that he said sorry, but it's what the sorry is about. it's not for what he said, but that they didn't get the policy right. they say they have a team that is looking at an administrative fix to get people covered who will be facing higher premiums who are not going to get
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subsidies. >> jeremy peters, as you listen to the president talk, he did apologize to that small percentage of those who would have the policies canceled. >> you are not supposed to grow a beard. >> is he going on the "today" show too? >> the make up lady was not here on time. >> the make up lady's fault. oh, wow. another non-apology. >> if you were donny, you would say the make up lady showed up and did the best she could. i'm so, what's the word? >> don't throw the make up lady under the bus. >> really? >> i told you the truth. it's kind of hot. not completely hot. close up, no good. >> as part of this nbc family, i
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am embarrassed about the men not being able to deliver. >> on the beard. >> it's not even a week. >> give it time. let's refocus. let's get back. what did you take away from the president apologizing yesterday? >> i think the question becomes now, what do republican dos with that? one of the things they struggled with is finding the right strategy. you have seen them come out with no substantive policies and legislation. it has been kind of let's fire kathleen sebelius and issue subpoenas. can they transition it into some sort of meaningful policy act here and really show that they are being a creative force, a constructively force. i am not seeing that happening yet, but i am starting to see that republicans realize they have to do more than just
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complain. >> so i'm going to go to donny and the overall messaging. john boehner responded to the president's interview through a statement reading in part if he is sincerely sorry the least he can do is support the bipartisan effort. otherwise this apology doesn't amount to anything. he was referring to a vote scheduled next week on the keep your health plan act that would allow people to keep plans as of january 1st of this year through 2014. the president has a team in place to close the gaps. >> i think that's a great idea for republicans to put the plan out. >> the big picture. >> that echoes the president's words over the past several years. if you want to keep your plan, you can keep your plan. if you want to keep your doctor, keep your doctor. i'm sure harry reid is going to try to kill that, but i'm sure
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there conservative or moderate democrats who will jump on that. >> it's interesting. the operative piece with the lady suffering from cancer and they took my doctors away and it will cost me more money and they show the coverage would increase. if six months from now or nine months from now people are getting better coverage and premiums are going down, i think they will stay the path and let's let the chips fall where they may. say you had a new car that was 500 miles per gallon. at the end of the day, people would be happy. >> there is no easy way to do this and handle a bad roll out. i think it was joe and chris and early on when this happened, they said the president just has to deal with this. he has to fix this. >> their focus is fixing the
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website. they think when the website is fixed, everything will fall into place and the product is good. that's the issue raised with the apology is it's acknowledging there is a flaw in the product and all along this is what they have been saying making the metaphor that the president used the other day. like going grocery shopping and everything in the store is good. they keep saying november 30th is what the deadline is to get this fixed. i don't think they would have said november 30th if they were not confident. let's hope. i'm surprised where we are today. >> the president had and i throw this to you too. what about his defense of kathleen sebelius. >> that's what a leader does. i think he would have looked weak if he said the right thing. it's my team. >> she was responsible though. when he said things like she's
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not an it expert, i am throwing this out there. >> it would be destructive. >> did everybody say he needed to handle that that way? >> one thing i hear from the colleagues is kathleen sebelius is in no danger of losing her job. one of the things i think we observed about this president is he really hunkers down when his team is under fire. you have seen this with eric holder and janet napolitano. when the right comes after his people which they have done with extreme fierceness over the last few years, he digs in. i don't think he is going to throw her under the bus. at least not yet. >> she is one of the more trusted members of the cabinet. >> one of the more trusted members and earliest supporters in 2008. a key endorsement in kansas back
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when he was running in the primaries and the caucuses. i think jeremy is right. kathleen sebelius is safe and the white house is not interested in ceremonial firings. they need to get through the website fix and come back and reassess. you said that kathleen sebelius was in charge and was somebody really in charge. there was a ceo of health care. that's part of the question here. there is nobody who has been accountable from start to finish for overseeing the implementation of this. >> there was a part of the interview where it was clear he felt he got in by the team and the people behind this. he said i got taken by this. the american people got taken by this website. i forget what the word was. burned. i got burned by the website. the american people did. it was telling. he is not happy.
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should shouldn't have happened. >> and the buck stops with him. >> the buck stops with him and he quickly fixed it in terms of what he was saying. it's about being responsible and he knows that. he is not happy. mitch mcconnell is speaking out about the tea party and peggy newman, the republican dismissed the gup thatter toial race saying the most important race was the special election for congress in south alabama where a candidate who said the shut down was a great idea. the president was born in kenya and he a posed speaker boehner. the tea party-backed candidate lot of to bradley burn, 52-48. he spoke about the tea party more generally saying in part many have been misled and told the reason we can't get better outcomes than we have gotten is not because the democrats control the senate and the white house, but the republicans have
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been insufficiently feisty. that's not true. the folks i have difficulty with are the leader who is mislead them for profit. they raise money and take their cut and spend it. connell who faces a tea party challenge said he is not worried about reelection bichltd i don't want to be overly cocky, but i will be the republican nominee next year. >> mitch mcconnell touches on something really important here for those at home who want to understand this and those conservatives who are trying to sort through what they are hearing from both sides. you have people who make millions and millions and millions of dollars preaching the kind of junk that has been preached over the past six months. if only the republicans were tougher, we would live in a land of lollipops, sunshine and a 12% flat tax. this ignores the fact that harry reid is the pocket veto for
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president obama. the president can veto anything he wants. this is about math. not ideology. i'm surprised connell had the guts to tell people the truth. this is all about money whether we are talking about on talk radio or talking about on tv or whether we are talking about special interest groups. people are making money selling snake oil. democrats control the senate and the white house. that's the way it is. >> it took him a long time to say it, but he did. this is why mitch mcconnell is so set. look where he did this interview. he did it with peggy newman. he knew exactly the audience he needed to reach to say look, guys, i know what's going on here. i may have been quiet for the last few months, but you can count on me. i am not fooled by ted cruz and i'm not going to let them push
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me around. >> coming up, we will check in with politico's mike allen. trimming the fat from processed foods. banning one artificial ingredient can save 7,000 lives a year. dr. nancy snyderman has the report. the senate passes legislation that protect gay and transgender americans from discrimination. what happens as the fight shifts to the house. first bill has a check on the forecast. a lot going on. >> potential for a snowstorm on the east coast next week. what we know yesterday, one of the strongest storms in recorded history went into the philippines. this was a super typhoon. winds were sustained at 195 miles per hour. that's like off the charts. there was gusts over 200. much stronger than andrew, katrina, and rita and some of the great storms to hit our country. we won't know how bad it was until the end of the weekend.
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remote areas got slammed. it's heading to vietnam. probably a category three storm. here in the u.s., very quiet up coming. chilly in the great lakes and rain showers in the northwest. the european computer model, one is saying potential for a snowstorm wednesday and thursday. the other american model is showing nothing. it shows the storm out to sea. it will be a big question if the storm happens or not, but the cold air will be here no matter what. otherwise it's a questioned weekend. the big things happening here in new york city, the christmas tree is cut down in connecticut and now here at 30 rockefeller plaza. will we cover it in snow next week? you are watching "morning joe."
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time to take a look at the morning papers. "the washington post" for the third time in five weeks, the electric car caught fire. the tesla has a battery pack located under the car. experts say a puncture to the shield covering the badly could ignite fire. shares fell in addition a loss of nearly 15% on wednesday. >> the "new york daily news" with chip wilson speaking out for the first time after months after issuing a recall for being see through. these are the pants that willie
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and i always use when we go over to the holiday inn and when we went over there, we thought the kids loved it. they were mocks us. >> this is the grossest thought. i just got sick. >> what did do you to the yoga pants. >> i use them for big ram hot yoga. >> i do too. everybody loves everybody. that stuff will make you sweat. that big ram hot yoga. you want every advantage you can get. >> in an interview, he said some women's bodies don't work for the company's pricey yoga pants. >> they are see through. >> he added rubbing on the thighs is a contributing factor. >> big ram yoga gets to be like 105 in there. you are sweating a lot. it doesn't help. >> i'm going to take over from here. you need to -- remember whey
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told you. you going to tell me to shut up again? >> shut up. >> the bill nearly two decades in the making to end workplace discrimination against the lgbt community and theifiable vote with ten republicans joining the 54 members of a democratic caucus. the bill faces an uphill battle in the house. how so? >> in the house, john boehner doesn't support it. he controls what goes to the floor. the question is whether or not they can attach the bill to a larger piece of legislation like the defense bill at the end of the year and slip it in and hope they can't object too much. >> now- >> never mind. >> it's not going to get through. from the home of the kansas city chiefs they write that the fda
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will do what many have done. cut out transfats across the board. it's harmful because it raises heart disease by increasing bad cholesterol and lowering good cholesterol levels. the move can prevent as many as 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths a year. here's nancy nightermans. >> it's in margarine, pizza and chips and more. transfats are used to increase the flavor and texture and shelf life of many foods. the u.s. food and drug administration announced it wants to eliminate them from the american diet. >> everybody recognizes that these artificial transfats represent a serious threat to health. they raise the risk of korer near artery disease and by working together, we can reduce artificial transfats further in the american diet. >> doctors say this move is a big step in the right direction.
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>> there is no nutritional benefit. they raise the low density protein or ldl, bad cholesterol and the hdl, the good cholesterol. >> transfat content was added to labels to help consumers to make wise choices. the following year new york city became the first to ban the ingredient in restaurants. others have since followed. even popular fast food restaurants have eliminated, replaced or reduced the use of transfats in their products. the grocery manufacturer's association responded by saying we look forward to better understand their concerns and how the industry can better serve consumers. food industry experts say if the measure is approved, they expect manufacturers to get creative to keep customers satisfied. >> there is no question that the scientists are hard at work coming up with all formulations
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that will continue to maximize the war the products. they will not ship stuff that is not as irresistibly tasty as they can possibly make it. >> of course, thank you, doctor snyderman. we will talk about this again. never. >> such a leader. >> i i want to talk about this. in north carolina, billy graham turned 95 years old and had a big celebration and people saw his last sermon he is going to give. 95 years old. he's a man who sat with presidents from jfk through bill clinton and pope john paul ii. the guy really has over the past 50 or so years had an extraordinary impact not only in america, but across the world. >> let's go to politico. >> he has to look at the
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playbook. >> good morning, willie and happy friday. >> the weekend begins with that. interesting doings in the state of georgia. the grandson of jimmy carter is running for governor, facing a battle against the incumbent. he handicapped the race a little bit. introduce us. >> fascinating georgia race. not only jason carter the grandson of the president, but the daughter of former senator. a couple of family races going on down there. the jason carter was a surprise. he's a state senator and said the top issues will be education and transparency and trust in governing. that's a throw at the current governor. jason carter is a lawyer to the university of georgia law school. the democratic party has been out of the state-wide office in
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georgia for a while. they hope they will get back in. when jason carter ran for state senate, his grandfather stayed out of it. he only campaigned at the end and wanted to earn it on his own and not trade on the family name. >> the dga got behind carter. he's a 38-year-old. does he have a shot? >> he has a primary first. he probably would win, but the current governor is strong. georgia is changing demographically. it is much more democratic. the obama campaign looked very early in the reelection race at targeting georgia because of new people moving in. the state is moving that way, but hasn't moved fast enough yet. we would call the governor the favorite in this race. >> cnbc predicted tough numbers in the monthly jobs report a few minutes from now. kelly evans will break it down
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for us when "morning joe" comes right back. bl this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "fumbling around with rotating categories" card. it's not the "getting blindsided by limits" card. it's the no-game-playing, no-earning-limit-having, deep-bomb-throwing, give-me-the-ball-and-i'll-take- it-to-the-house, cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. so let me ask you... what's in your wallet? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy.
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that's a great shot of new york city. business before the bell with kelly evans and the monthly job report was released. >> much better than expected. going into this report, a lot of people thought it could be one of the weakest because of the government shut down. we found out the economy added 204,000 jobs last month and 212,000 for the private sector. that's probably one of the strongest reports of this year. if we continue to see growth this strong, you will see a lot more talk about the fed exiting the picture. that is pushing up rates. the borrowing rate jumped to 2.7%. they could see that as a head wind. this is important this month in particular. yes on the one hand job creation was strong. the trouble is on the other hand there were several people that determine the unemployment rate. they were considered unemployed while they were affected by the furloughs or shut down.
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that boosted the unemployment rate to 7.3% and the size of the amount of people collapsed. i would ignore what is going with an effect and focus on the fact that we had decent job creation. they were revised higher by 60,000. we had 300,000 more job than we thought hours ago. >> we will take that. thank you. join lgsing us now on how to create jobs in america, the authors of where the jobs are. john and courtney are joining us. senator from delaware, your reaction to the jobs numbers? >> it's encouraging. we have head winds, about you we continue to grow. we had many, many quarters in a row of strong private sector growth, but we could be doing better. the point of the segment is to focus on what are the things we could be doing?
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republicans and democrats and house and senate to reduce for the economy and help start up businesses to grow so we can get more americans back to work. >> we have to get the pathway open for them. where are the jobs? >> i think the unique part of this economy as we were talking about before we went on air, it's a different economy than what we have seen before. that means that the enterprises are creating virtually all new jobs. the growth potential there is enormous. we need to focus on places where we can create a better environment for those to really get things moving. >> the growth potential is enormous. where is it and how does someone who is out of the game capture or jump in or grab on to this changing economy? >> this project on which the book is based was a revelation to us. we started out trying to come up
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with new ideas as you asked about how we can increase jobs and opportunities for people to jump in. we were unaware that most new jobs in this economy are created by new businesses and not small businesses. small businesses are very, very important for lots of reasons, but with recent ones, when it comes to net new jobs, it is in the internationalial economy. our surprise is in trouble. if it remained the number of new businesses being launched in this economy it remains consistent for decades and decades. it peaked in 2005 and started again for the first time. with the nature of our party is to try to figure out why is that happening?
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>> why don't you tap into why or where legislatively we could agree on it. we will find ways to make that happen. >> they went across the country and visited with those who have started. they surveyed and they introduced with a prospect of moving forward. the start up act from kansas and virginia and missouri, republicans and democrats worked together on a bill that deals with immigration and access to capital and tax rates and regulatory reform. the whole of things we need to do to help the fragile and high potential and high growth. we are uniquely enterprisial and we grow very quickly unlike others in the world. washington needs to get out of the way and provide juice for the engine. we have a range of strong policy
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ideas to make that possible. these are bills that are already possible for us to pass if we get them to quit fighting and try to shut the government down and focus on growing jobs. >> where the jobs are. thank you very much. senator, thank you as well. up next, faith on fridays. father james martin joins us alongside them for an unprecedented look inside the catholic church. "morning joe" will be right back. bl ♪ as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way, rethink how you're invested, and refocus
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as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity i.r.a. has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today, and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity i.r.a. life with crohn's disease ois a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps end our night before it even starts? what if i eat the wrong thing? what if? what if i suddenly have to go? what if? but what if the most important question is the one you're not asking? what if the underlying cause of your symptoms is damaging inflammation? for help getting the answers you need, talk to your doctor and visit crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education.
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>> faith on fridays. the america magazine. father james martin and the father of the global vatican. ambassador to the holy sea. francis rooney. good to have you both on board. investor rooney, you have known my father for quite sometime. >> i have. the center for strategic international studies. you can me something i don't know about him? >> i don't think so. >> just making sure. let's start with this new pope who is to me transformational. i would love your opinions and how the catholic church does try to overcome those who feel ostracized which i think is an issue. do you agree? >> it's an issue in diplomacy as well. as many of us talked about, you can't have a stable democracy
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and good environment without rule an rights. he is speaking about seeking to demote the same human dignitiy that diplomacy and the united states stands for. >> is there anything that concerns you given his vast popularity, but he said things that other popes have not said. i have never heard from a catholic priest. >> nothing concerns me. he is preaching the gospel and if it disrupts and disturbs people it's the same way that jesus did. it's stuff we need to hear. we were discussing back stage that the church gets the pope they need for the times. >> it seems so fundamental to do what he's done and send a survey out to make sure that he is in touch with the needs and the problems in the people's lives.
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>> these are the questions he sought to answer on the host of issues. it's so fundamental. >> the leadership and to see this leadership lesson from the post seems to tran cent a faith community. >> know one thing is he is recognizing that the holy spirit is at work in the people of god. the faithful in the pews. i think that's fantastic. >> exact low. it shows that this pope is dedicated to modernizing the operation of the holy sea. he has undertaken this form to make sure they comply with money laundering and reaching out and getting customer feedback. >> is the sur fay unprecedented? >> they want to provide feedback and a worldwide survey and a poll is unprecedented. per are who is answering the
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questions? is it the bishops or beyond? >> they are supposed to provide feedback, but up to them to provide the results. a lot of them will do the surveys. >> how do you think this will change? the church's approach. what do you think the church and pope will learn that they don't already know? >> first of all, it will further delay the involvement in the church. that's important and this pope has spoken up a great deal. if you fuse that into the work of the good fathers like martin and the jesuits, you have what they are supposed to do. >> incredible. >> the book is the global vatican. thank you so much. and father james martin as well. thank you so much for faith on fridays this morning. keep it here on "morning joe." avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive"
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and unitedhealth group. was a truly amazing day.ey, without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers. you can find it all on angie's list.
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they said in the past, you get the point. >> she interrupts me all the time. that's all right. >> you shut up, okay? you just be quiet. let me do the news and shut up. >> that's the third time you told me to shut up.
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>> help us understand. >> on the program, it was the biggest launch. the biggest start up in the history of the world. >> this is a long game. i think everywhere is worried about this. >> the white house said that people are still on their couch and procrastinate and come in at the end. >> they come with a lot of hair gel. what happens in a circumcision stays in a circumcision. >> the modern digital age. >> poor baby. you haven't been that well behaved. >> let's not. >> should we buy this stock? >> i won't even answer off camera let alone on camera. >> okay, i will ask. should i buy twitter? >> look how much they love each other. also notice there is a clock.
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>> time now for a few business before the bell stories. >> that's a good decision. >> mika, remember. one seat for me and two for my ears. >> they hope to play alabama. they can see how the jacket is looking. day two of a 30-day journey we will be on together. >> nothing happening. are we are so glad you are here today. we hope this has been just as satisfying for you. it has been a wonderful time. >> fulfilling. >> i think it might be the longest week ever in the history of "morning joe." i just got sick and tired. we got a huge response to lewis's piece on humans of new york. that ran on tuesday. it was so good. go on the website. you can find it on
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mojo@msnbc.com. congratulations on his "new york times" best willing is book, humans of new york released last week. that was a really great piece. up next, what if anything did we learn today? anything? huh...fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know.
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a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation -- an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner
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for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem. that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. so jim's not tied to that monitoring routine. [ gps ] proceed to the designated route. not today. [ male announcer ] for patients currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. xarelto® is just one pill a day taken with the evening meal. plus, with no known dietary restrictions, jim can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto®, rivaroxaban, without talking to the doctor who prescribes it as this may increase the risk of having a stroke. get help right away if you develop any symptoms like bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. you may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take xarelto® with aspirin products, nsaids or blood thinners. talk to your doctor before taking xarelto® if you have abnormal bleeding. xarelto® can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. you are likely to bruise more easily on xarelto® and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. tell your doctors you are taking xarelto®
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before any planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is not for patients with artificial heart valves. jim changed his routine. ask your doctor about xarelto®. once a day xarelto® means no regular blood monitoring -- no known dietary restrictions. for more information and savings options, call 1-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com.
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>> dot loves to talk and talk and talk. dot is all talked out. look at dot on the floor. mom said go outside, dot. time reboot, recharge, restart outside. >> yea! >> dot remembers. >> it's great to be back. i don't know what the hell that just was. i leave and donny is at your feet. i don't get it. what did you learn today? >> i'm going to the fabulous school to speak to the ladies there. >> i don't know what that means, but i'm excited too. >> i learned as his friends we feed to do something for donny who really enjoyed the whole mommy thing more than mika did
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and story time represented the highlight of his week. >> i am moved. so glad i was downstairs. >> that and the ricardo mannedal ban thing. we can't even get a cup of tea. >> get the hot water to work in the cafeteria. >> right behind us. we have to say look at this. the brock lynn bridge park bandids or whatever you are called. congratulations. good job, man. >> wrap it up, joe. >> come on. you can't just walk off like that. finish the job. it's way too early, what time is it? >> time for "morning joe" and "the daily rundown" with chuck todd who takes a licking and keeps on ticking. >> thank you for your patience. i swear to god i will be better next week. here you go.